ISU

2020 Virtual World Synchronized Skating Championships

Today was to have been the culmination of the last year’s worth of hard work for the teams who qualified to compete at the 2020 ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships in Lake Placid, USA. The unfortunate (but understandable) cancellation of the event due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic left thousands of people — not least of all, the skaters — heartbroken to miss out on the chance to experience these wonderful programs one last time.

But, as the saying goes, “Necessity is the mother of invention.” To help fill the gap left by the event’s cancellation, teams from around the globe came together to create a Virtual Worlds on Youtube — complete with promo videos for teams, opening ceremonies, and a virtual draw.

Though it’s not exactly the same as watching (or streaming) it live, it’s impossible not to admire the creative teamwork required to bring this digital event together. And there’s no better time to sit back, relax, and enjoy some skating videos, than when you’re at home distancing yourself from the outside world.

Thank you, and well done to all those involved!

2019-20 Synchronized Skating Rules

Always consult the ISU website for the most up to date rules and regulations.

Special Regulations & Technical Rules

Contains definitions of Elements, Features, and Additional Features, as well as rules related to the Call to Start, Interruptions, Costume Deductions, and more. Can be downloaded and printed, or purchased from the ISU website. This document is the foundation for all other Communications.

Technical Requirements (ISU Comm. 2270)

Specifies what’s required to achieve the different difficulty levels of each Element.

GOE and PCS Guidelines (ISU Comm. 2246)

Specifies criteria Judges use to assess the quality of Elements and programs.

Scale of Values (ISU Comm. 2259)

Specifies the point value of each Element.

Technical Handbook

Specifies the calls and penalties for Elements, Features, and Additional Features, based on how they are executed.

For more information about how to apply each of these documents, refer to the article, “Demystifying the Judging System: Part 2, Rules.” (Note that it refers to 2018 rules.) Consult your governing body’s website for any additional rules specific to your country or region.

2019-20 GOE Guidelines Explained

When the new rules for the upcoming synchronized skating season are published each year, many of us gravitate towards the technical documents. But trying out a “GOE first” mindset could be what really sets your team apart this season.

There are always many new technical details to understand, and determining which difficulty levels will be appropriate for your team is of course a crucial part of program construction. But year after year, I see many teams focus only on technical aspects, and treat GOE as an afterthought.

Teams prioritize getting their levels called, without realizing that attention to GOE can actually help improve their technical scores. Having good shape, unison, speed and flow goes a long way towards the successful execution of all Elements — and especially those like Intersections, weaving Circles, and Moves Elements where there’s little room for error when skaters are in close proximity.

With that in mind, here are the important things to note about GOE in ISU Communication 2246.

(more…)

ISU 2019-20 Well Balanced Program Content

With the 2019 World Synchronized Skating Championships barely a week behind us, it’s already time to start planning for next season. The Well Balanced Program Content for 2019-20 has been released, and programs will look quite different from what we saw this year. Here are the changes. (more…)